Africa in UK Parliament: Ivory Coast/Sudan – 20th June 2011

Ivory Coast – House of Lords, Written answers and statements, 20 June 2011

Lord Chidgey (Liberal Democrat)

To ask Her Majesty’s Government whether, in the light of continuing instability in the Ivory Coast and the continuing occupation of police stations in many cities by elements of the Ivory Coast Republican Forces (FRCI), they are discussing possible disarmament, demobilisation and reintegration measures with international partners and the Government of the Ivory Coast.

Lord Howell of Guildford (Minister of State, Foreign and Commonwealth Office; Conservative)

Security Sector Reform is one of the many challenges facing the Government of Cote d’Ivoire as they seek to recover from the recent conflict. We will work with fellow United Nations Security Council members to agree an appropriate level of United Nations support for disarmament, demobilisation and reintegration. We will also continue discussions with partners about EU support to this process. The Minister for Africa, my honourable friend Mr Bellingham discussed these issues with the then Ivorian Foreign Minister during his recent attendance at the inauguration of President Ouattara on 20-21 June.

Sudan – House of Lords, Written answers and statements, 20 June 2011

Lord Alton of Liverpool (Crossbench)

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what assessment they have made of who has been responsible for the fighting in Kadugli, the Sudanese capital of Southern Kordofan; of the number of people who have been displaced; of the role of the United Nations mission; and of the humanitarian and security implications.

Baroness Verma (Whip, House of Lords; Conservative)

Our initial reporting from Kadugli suggests that violence has been carried out by both the Sudanese Armed Forces and the Sudan People’s Liberation Army.

The latest unconfirmed reports from the UN that we have received indicate that about 53,000 people have fled fighting in Kadugli. Some of these displaced people have turned to UNMIS for refuge, and are now camping by their gates. The role of UNMIS is critical in the protection of these civilians, as such we welcome the additional deployment of a Bangladeshi battalion to enable UNMIS to carry out this role.

We are very concerned that the continuing violence will have a negative impact on the long-term security and humanitarian situation. Together with our international partners, we are supporting the AU-facilitated negotiations to resolve their differences. We are urgently pressing both parties to cease hostilities and seek a peaceful resolution to their differences.

Emergency humanitarian co-ordination meetings have taken place on a regular basis in Khartoum and Juba. At present, lack of access hinders a more accurate assessment.

Sudan – House of Lords, Written answers and statements, 20 June 2011

Lord Alton of Liverpool (Crossbench)

To ask Her Majesty’s Government whether recent events in Abyei and South Kordofan will affect the United Kingdom’s intention to grant official recognition to the Republic of South Sudan on 9 July.

Lord Howell of Guildford (Minister of State, Foreign and Commonwealth Office; Conservative)

We are greatly concerned at the violence in Abyei and South Kordofan, however the UK still expects to recognise the state of South Sudan on or after 9 July 2011.

Sudan – House of Lords, Written answers and statements, 20 June 2011

Lord Alton of Liverpool (Crossbench)

To ask Her Majesty’s Government what action they are taking to persuade the Government of Sudan to seek a negotiated future for the 75,000 Sudan People’s Liberation Army soldiers in Joint Integrated Units in South Kordofan and Blue Nile regions of Sudan.

Lord Howell of Guildford (Minister of State, Foreign and Commonwealth Office; Conservative)

This issue forms a part of wider discussions on the Southern Kordofan and Blue Nile under the Comprehensive Peace Agreement. We continue to urge both sides to come to an agreement on the long term Disarmament, Demobilisation and Reintegration process, cease hostilities immediately and return to the negotiating table. Michael Ryder, the UK Special Envoy to Sudan, visited Addis Ababa on 12 and 13 June, to participate in talks intended to find a negotiated solution.

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